18
Jan
10

gothic love – the blackest gift

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gothic love – the blackest gift

It is a night of dark desire, a song of ethereal pain,
wolves vent their loneliness. The beautiful one
stirs.

Curling wisps of death shrouds her deathly form,
a lurking fear.

Her inky black hair cascades over
translucent ivory shoulders, and her
full deeply crimson lips part slightly, to taste the
red tears streaming from the
pale flesh beneath
her.

Now a night of taking,
I weep.

dont be alone in the dark anymore ! find your gothic love right now !

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21
Nov
09

gothic definition

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Gothic Love
Defining the word “Gothic” is rather slippery since the word has a lot of
different connotations and denotations.

I’ll start at the top:

“Gothic” can refer to any of a number of tribes living mainly in Germany
and other parts of central Europe during the late Roman (fourth and fifth
century) periods. These tribes included (obviously) the Ostrogoths and
the Visigoths.
“Gothic” refers to a style of architecture popular in England, France,
and in some parts of central and western Europe between the late twelfth
and early fifteenth centuries. The style was noted for the use of flying
buttresses, high vaulted ceilings, and a general “lightness” of
architecture as opposed to the preceding “Romanesque” style which had a
much more utilitarian bent to it. The architectural form underwent a
revival of sorts during the nineteenth century, especially in England and
the United States. The term can also refer to a style of armor produced
chiefly in Germany during the original “Gothic” architectural period.
These suits of armor can be distinguished by their generally
close-fitting design and spikiness of style, as well as the extreme use
of fluting both for decorative and practical purposes.
“Gothic” refers to a style of writing popular in the late eighteenth and
nineteenth centuries; the “Gothic” novel being a brief but extremely
common example of this style. “Gothic” works are focused primarily upon
the “dark” side of humanity, with paranormal and unexplainable events
liberally sprinkled into the story, which itself is typically set in some
dark and forboding area such as a huge mansion of unbelievable age or an
underground labyrinth.
“Gothic” in the sense that it is frequently used today refers
simultaneously to a fashion and frame of mind that is increasingly
popular. The fashion aspects are readily identifiable: pale skin, black
clothing (either predominantly or exclusively), et cetera, et cetera. The
frame of mind is equally easy to identify: a generally sardonic attitude,
disillusionment, a sense of “jadedness” foreign to youths of the fifties,
et cetera. In short, the “Gothic” frame of mind as it is commonly spoken
of today is a sort of revival of the mindset of the “Lost Generation” of
the 1920s.

21
Nov
09

gothic love – Gothic phonetics

The phonetics in Gothic are pretty
simple except for the business about /ai/ and /au/.   We really have no
other source for Gothic except for the Wulfilas Bible translations and the
-Skeireins-, so the evidence of the language and script of these texts is
pretty much all the Gothic we have.
My understanding is that the current opinion is that these sounds were
also very simple, and there were at best a short and long version of both.
Wulfilas invented himself an alphabet to write Gothic in.  There is no
reason at all why he would have mushed together all sorts of different
phonemes into that written symbol, especially since by making a new
alphabet he obviously had a choice.
But you’d probably have better luck with the Asatru people, or on an
academic list for Germanic languages and linguistics.

Gothic Love

21
Nov
09

gothic love – gothic colorado

Gothic Love

I am sorry to say that the events in Colorado does not sadden me at all. I am
just taken back that the society that used these two individuals as objects of
there amusement got what they created. How dare these religious wackos allow
there fake beliefs to cover up what they caused. No one has the right to push
there beliefs on anyone. So in this situation we see that because these
individuals were not on the they were made examples and given hard
times because they did not belong to the group. There is a lesson to be learned
that if you treat everyone with respect and honor then in return you will also
be treated that way.
Society is now trying to say that being Gothic is abnormal.  Gothic is not
about hurting anyone or disturbing anyone’s views. Learn about what the Gothic
life style represents and its founding culture.  Then and only then can you
understand that the media and the religious freaks are using what they created
as an excuse to place the blame somewhere else.

21
Nov
09

love gothic runa

Before the Germanic peoples of ancient Western Europe
possessed a true alphabet, they used pictorial symbols
to carve into stones their ideas and thoughts.  The
earliest of these pictorial writings date from about
1300 BC. They were probably linked to Sun and Fertility
cults.  Among the signs were parts of the human body,
weapons, animals and variations on the circle, square,
and swastika.  These pictoglyphs later evolved into the
more abstract glyphs that were composed of lines
resembling no particular objects.  That there was power
endowed to those who were adept at the use of these
glyphs is indicated by the name given to the glyphs
themselves.  These glyphs were called Runes, from the
Gothic Runa, meaning ‘a secret thing, a mystery.’  The
Runic letter or Runastafr was use to foretell the
future by Runemal, or the casting of the Runes.  The
Runes were inscribed into tools, weapons, rocks,
alters, and other personal items.  Runes were also used
by the clergy as an alternative to the Latin alphabet.
It is believed that Runes were derived from a northern
Etruscan alphabet used among Italic tribes in the
Eastern Alps.  They may have been developed by people
living in the area of Bohemia.  From the beginning
Runes were used for the casting of lots, for divination
and to evoke higher powers that might influence the
‘luck’ of man. There were Runes that influenced the
weather, the harvest, curses, the tides, love, and
healing.  The Practicianer of Runemal was easily
recognizable by the very clothing they wore.  As the
13th century author of the ‘Saga of Erik the Red’ said,
“She wore a cloak set with stones along the hem.
Around her neck and covering her head she wore a hood
lined with white catskins.  In one hand she carried a
staff with a knob on the end and her belt, holding
together her long dress, hung a charm pouch.”  As you
can also see from this passage, many of the Rune
Masters were women.  As time wore on, the Runes
themselves became standardized through out Europe.
Although in some places the Runes numbered as many as
36 or as few as 16.  Twenty-four of these were the
basic Runes, or futhark.  The name futhark comes from
the first 6 Runes.  There were 3 families of 8 Runes
each, named after the Norse Gods Freyr, Hagal and Tyr.
These three aettir, as they were called were:

Freyr’s Eight: Fehu, Uruz, Thurisaz, Ansuz, Raido,
Kano, Gebo, Wunjo
Hagal’s Eight: Hagalaz, Nauthiz, Isa, Jera,
Eihwaz, Perth, Algiz, Sowelu
Tyr’s Eight:   Teiwaz, Berkana, Ehwaz,
Mannaz, Laguz, Inguz, Othila, Dagaz.

The Anglo-Saxons are credited with spreading Runes and
Runecraft through out Europe.  It is unfortunate that
more than 300 years ago the last of the Rune Masters
died taking with them the true art of Rune casting. In
recent years people such as Ralph Blum have tired to
revive the ancient art of Rune Casting through books,
casting Runes, and through research into ancient books
and manuscripts for references to Runes.

Gothic love

21
Nov
09

Hello gothic love world!

Welcome to Gothic Love . This is my first post.

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